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Necessity is the Mother of Invention

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

I grew up in a creative and artistic family where extra money and  material extravagances were not readily available and imagination and ingenuity was the currency in which we worked.   This was well before the myriad of television programs, competitions and spectacles that feature the make over of a home in a day or the even more unrealistic purchase of a house in one day (although with my impulse for purchasing homes this could be possible).

So when we sent over the container last winter  I made sure that it was packed with various products for DIY.  My dedicated DIY  closet is now jammed with products to distress, paint, refinish and redo any number of household objects.  Among the most important item in my arsenal is a large container of Mod Podge,

Mod Podge
Mod Podge

My fascination with this product began years ago out of necessity as well.  I do not fancy myself a ‘real’ artist, so the best I could muster was to take images already fabricated and produced (many of them vintage) and decoupage them to glass or wood to enable me to create my own original artwork.  Plus it is fun to ferret old advertisements for products that are now long gone.

Italian label
Italian label

In this instance we purchased a poster of Villa Medici at Cafagiolo,

 

We carried the print  over to Ficulle, and then went to the local wood mill to have a piece cut to the size of the print.

Segheria Wood Mill

 

We trimmed the edges of the print to fit the wood and brushed a liberal amount of the mod podge over the entire piece of wood.

Trimming the Print
Trimming the Print
Coating the Paper
Coating the Paper

The glue (Mod Podge or Elmer’s) is white and sticky but dries clear.  Next you adhere the paper to the wood.  We started in the center and then pressed outwards with the help of a brayer to the edges trying to keep paper smooth.

Brayer
Brayer

It is important (and difficult) to get out all the air bubbles on the paper.  If you are like John Derian, the famous decoupage artist, this will be second nature, but if you are like me, it is always a challenge.   We applied several additional layers of glue using a cross hatch stroke with the brush to add dimension and interest to the piece letting the glue dry between applications.

Cross hatch to add texture
Cross hatch to add texture

We were rewarded with a unique piece of artwork –  not too expensive – that we feel adds to the distinctive appeal of our home.

Villa Cafagiolo
Villa Cafagiolo

 

 

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Comments (3)

  1. Lidy@FrenchGardenHouse

    Lisa, what a beautiful accent you created! I love this, I’m sure it looks wonderful in your home. It’s so rewarding to create personal accents for our homes, isn’t it? A brilliant idea.

    1. Lisa

      Thanks Lidy. In the fall we hope to be able to add a wooden frame. You are right, there is always so much satisfaction in creating.

  2. thefolia

    Happy crafting, creating and making!

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